Seasonal fever and Dengue fever is eventually the talk of the town.
  • The impacts of climate and climate change on the dynamics, distribution, and spread of infectious diseases have been the subject of considerable debate
  • The most important parameter for distinguishing between the two fevers questioned is “platelet count monitoring” and “hemoglobin and hematocrit monitoring.”
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    High Fever: Dengue or Seasonal?

    • Seasonal fever and Dengue fever is eventually the talk of the town.
    • The impacts of climate and climate change on the dynamics, distribution, and spread of infectious diseases have been the subject of considerable debate
    • The most important parameter for distinguishing between the two fevers questioned is “platelet count monitoring” and “hemoglobin and hematocrit monitoring.”

    25 Oct 2022

     These two terms are now the talk of the town! Where to distinguish between them or find a connection is not an easy task now.

    Dengue fever, caused by a mosquito-borne virus, is a growing health problem these days. Meteorological variables such as temperature and precipitation can influence disease distribution and incidence through biophysical impacts on the vector and virus. Such tight linkages may facilitate the further spread of dengue in a changing climate.

    The impacts of climate and climate change on the dynamics, distribution, and spread of infectious diseases have been the subject of considerable debate, as temperature can impact the seasonality and intensity of infectious disease transmission. Dengue fever, caused by a virus spread mainly by the Aedes aegypti mosquito, is the epitome of a disease whose rapid spread may be fueled in part by changing climate conditions.

    Precipitation can increase vector density by providing breeding habitat, and temperature affects mosquito hatching rate, development time, and survival. Temperature further affects the dynamics of virus transmission by shortening the external incubation period.

    This is an important advance in understanding the links between climate change and disease, as current and future climate scenarios can be used to simulate local mosquito populations for comparison. At the same time, the complexity of the ecology of mosquito-borne diseases means that not all locations will experience disease increases, and some may actually experience declines under future climate conditions.

    Dengue fever is a viral disease transmitted by mosquitoes. The peak of the dengue epidemic season is around June to August during the rainy season. There has been an increase in the intensity of the outbreak locally and globally. The incidence of dengue fever has increased 30-fold worldwide over the past 50 years. From a local perspective, dengue cases are still on the high rise in West Bengal, with the state recording more than 7,000 vector-borne infections in the past week, an average of 1,000 cases a day. While the hospitals and clinics are complaining about high fever which makes them all skeptical for the same Dengue.

     Dengue is caused by four types of dengue viruses that are spread by infected mosquitoes. Dengue patients show symptoms such as chills, fatigue, fever, loss of appetite, nausea, vomiting, body rash, aches and pains (eye pain, typically behind the eyes, muscle, joint or bone pain). whereas Viral Fever excludes severe body aches,vomiting and others.

    A typical dengue patient goes through three phases: febrile, critical, and convalescent. In the febrile phase, the characteristic symptom is fever and body pain, and fever-reducing drugs (paracetamol) and plenty of fluids are sufficient. Most patients seem to pass directly from the febrile phase to the recovery phase without developing an obvious critical phase. However, some patients develop what are medically called "warning signs" that indicate the need for hospitalization and close monitoring due to  vomiting, abdominal pain, severe headache, persistent pain anywhere else in the body

    The most important parameter for distinguishing between the two fevers questioned is “platelet count monitoring” and “hemoglobin and hematocrit monitoring”, the latter being more important than the platelet count monitoring in dengue fever. These two values ​​should be checked on the second/third day of fever and monitored closely, especially in a patient who continues to have symptoms.

    An increase in hemoglobin and hematocrit indicates poor oral intake (and thus the need for hospitalization), while a decrease in hemoglobin and hematocrit together with clinical deterioration indicates internal bleeding and therefore also requires hospitalization. A slight decrease in these two parameters together with an improvement in symptoms indicates that the patient is entering the recovery phase of the disease.

    A low platelet count alone (unless it is drastically low) does not usually indicate the need for hospital admission. Even if the platelet count is low, platelets should only be transfused if the count is less than 10,000/cm or if there is evidence of active bleeding from any site. For most other critically ill patients, reasonable monitored intravenous fluids will suffice to overcome the crisis.

     


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